INVESTIGATIONS
NON-SUPPORT
Parents have a legal obligation to provide support for their children and failure to provide such support is considered a crime against the state, generally known as criminal nonsupport.

Criminal nonsupport statutes exist, in some form, in all 50 states. The severity of the punishments range from misdemeanors with small fines and short jail sentences to felonies with high fines and lengthy prison terms. While the elements of the statutes vary from state to state, generally a state must prove that (1) the defendant acted knowingly or intentionally; and (2) the defendant failed to provide support.

The chart below outlines the type of crime and the maximum penalties available for criminal nonsupport in all 50 states.
INTERNAL THEFT

Employee theft is an issue besetting retailers every day. A 2005 survey by the University of Florida puts the cost at $17.6 billion, and concludes that employee theft accounts for 47% of inventory shrinkage.

Responses to this epidemic range from low tech (like rewards for employees turning in thieves) to high tech (such as computer monitoring of transactions to reveal issues that would normally go undetected by managers). Yet unscrupulous employees remain undeterred and continue to try to beat the system. What is even more upsetting is that catching an employee red-handed on video sliding groceries will not prevent the employee from bringing some form of wrongful termination claim. Many individuals, even guilty ones, feel compelled to try to clear their name. Even though the employer will likely eventually win such a suit, the expense and time involved can cost hundreds of times the amount of the theft.

WORKERS COMPENSATION

Workers compensation fraud occurs when a claimant, employer, or health care provider knowingly lies in order to gain an advantage, savings, money, or other benefit. While many people believe that workers compensation fraud solely consists of employees lying about or exaggerating their injuries, workers compensation fraud can involve both employers and employees.

The below infographic shows the comparison between employer and employee workers compensation fraud, as well as statistics and consequences.

MISSING PERSONS

On average, more than 800,000 people are reported as missing and are entered into FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) annually. Of these, 85%-90% are minors. These statistics do not include those who are unofficially missing such as those who have not been reported as missing persons.

One of the big problems with police-led missing persons searches is simply that the term missing persons is so narrow. Police will only begin looking for a missing child at a specific amount of time after the child was last seen and by that time, it may be too late if the child has been kidnapped by a pedophile or child killer. Police are also reluctant, due to thinning resources, to search for people who voluntarily left home or for those who live on the streets. Even in a police-led missing person search, police will stop looking after a certain amount of time and will declare the case a cold case.

Police do their best with the resources they have, but law enforcement simply is not equipped to deal with the crime rates today.
CHILD CUSTODY

A child custody investigation is an objective observation of a child’s well-being and treatment, usually as part of a divorce, separation, or custody case.

A typical investigation involves an investigator assessing the treatment of a child by his or her parents. The conclusion of the investigator is then reported to the court and used in custody evaluations. When going through a divorce, a child custody investigation will provide reliable evidence without the bias.